Surviving R. Kelly

Ok, so here is an update on my thoughts on the whole R. Kelly situation. First, for those who don’t know let me catch you up. So last weekend the tv network Lifetime aired a docuseries featuring over 50 people discussing their interactions with R. Kelly. Most of them were women who had been teenagers at the time R. Kelly had come into their life. These women talked about the mental, emotional, and physical abuse that R. Kelly put them through. Before I go on I have to admit that I was one of those people who held on to the fact that R. Kelly was a musical genius and ignored the previous allegations like the well-known fact of him urinating on an underage girl years ago. I still bumped his music. I’m not even going to pretend I didn’t, but now from the things I’ve heard and connecting the dots I can’t bring myself to listen to his music anymore. The fact that I now know that he married a 15-year-old Aaliyah and what he did to countless other women and even more there were other subliminal clues that I never considered before. Why did R. Kelly name himself “The Pied Piper of R&B”? The Pied Piper is a character in folk lore that lured a village’s children away by playing a flute. That’s a red flag right there and then realizing a lot of his earlier music was aimed toward these young girls he manipulated. Enough is enough in my book. You can only make excuses for a person for so long. There is a lot of heated debates on the topic. Some people are still defending him and others are saying throw him under the jail. What are your thoughts?

Being an emotional reader

I am a self-proclaimed emotional reader. By my definition, an emotional reader is a person who gets so invested in a story and with the story’s characters that you become happy or sad when something good or bad happens to them and you can REALLY claim yourself as an emotional reader when you find yourself shedding tears over those characters. That would be me. Right now I’m in the middle of reading Needful Things by Stephen King and I shed a tear because a character (a child) committed suicide because of overwhelming guilt, not entirely his fault. Even when I saw it coming I had to put the book down and shake my head and I just kept saying “oh god no no no” but the inevitable happened…the fatal outcome. If you’re an emotional reader like me you shouldn’t be ashamed. One of my friends just reminded me it’s because I have a pure imagination, but let’s not also forget that Stephen King is an amazing writer who really focuses on character development. I believe that’s the main reasons his books are so long. He really digs deep into each character and you either love them or hate them and you feel tied to those characters.