John Cusack’s The Raven

I am a huge Edgar Allan Poe fan, and the other day I came across the movie “The Raven” starring John Cusack who played the role of the famous Edgar Allan Poe. I thought the plot of the story was extremely interesting and it was a nice twist/interpretation of the last days of Poe’s life. So the story basically goes that someone in town is committing murders using inspiration from Poe’s famous works. The stories that are used are “The Pit and the Pendulum,” “The Cask of Amontillado,” “The Masque of the Red Death,” “Murders in the Rue Morgue,” and “The Mystery of Marie Roget.” The detective on the case enlists Poe to help him solve these murders and Poe finally figures out who it is and of course it’s someone who no one expects and then the movie ends with a scene that is documented in history that says that the “Poe was found delirious on the streets of Baltimore…He is said to have repeatedly called out the name “Reynolds” on the night before his death, though it is unclear to whom he was referring. Some sources say that Poe’s final words were ‘Lord help my poor soul.'” This is basically how the movie ends and we see Poe in the morgue, nobody knowing exactly his cause of death. I really enjoyed the movie for a couple of reasons. One, I really am a big Poe fan so I thought this was an interesting perspective to take with the movie. Two, this movie made me want to read more Poe. For example, I’ve never read the story “The Mystery of Marie Roget” but just from watching this it made me want to read it. You should check it out if you love mystery, thriller, and Poe.

Poe’s Influence

Just the other day me and my family were talking about Edgar Allan Poe. Me and my dad were both saying how “The Tell-Tale Heart” is our favorite story by Poe. I absolutely love Poe. I have one big, thick book of all of his collected short stories and poems and Tell -Tale Heart will always be my favorite. I thought that story was always intense. I like the ending:

“I gasped for breath –and yet the officers heard it not. I talked more quickly –more vehemently; but the noise steadily increased. I arose and argued about trifles, in a high key and with violent gesticulations; but the noise steadily increased. Why would they not be gone? I paced the floor to and fro with heavy strides, as if excited to fury by the observations of the men –but the noise steadily increased. Oh God! what could I do? I foamed –I raved –I swore! I swung the chair upon which I had been sitting, and grated it upon the boards, but the noise arose over all and continually increased. It grew louder –louder –louder! And still the men chatted pleasantly, and smiled. Was it possible they heard not? Almighty God! –no, no! They heard! –they suspected! –they knew! –they were making a mockery of my horror!-this I thought, and this I think. But anything was better than this agony! Anything was more tolerable than this derision! I could bear those hypocritical smiles no longer! I felt that I must scream or die! and now –again! –hark! louder! louder! louder! louder!

“Villains!” I shrieked, “dissemble no more! I admit the deed! –tear up the planks! here, here! –It is the beating of his hideous heart.”

*I always thought that was genius writing. The intensity just kept building and building and then bybthe end of the story the man’s paranoia got the better of him and he admitted to his crime. Poe really built a name for himself because of his twisted mind He was really consider the father of horror and father of the detective story. I love writers who are a little off and Poe really messed with your mind.