Being an emotional reader

I am a self-proclaimed emotional reader. By my definition, an emotional reader is a person who gets so invested in a story and with the story’s characters that you become happy or sad when something good or bad happens to them and you can REALLY claim yourself as an emotional reader when you find yourself shedding tears over those characters. That would be me. Right now I’m in the middle of reading Needful Things by Stephen King and I shed a tear because a character (a child) committed suicide because of overwhelming guilt, not entirely his fault. Even when I saw it coming I had to put the book down and shake my head and I just kept saying “oh god no no no” but the inevitable happened…the fatal outcome. If you’re an emotional reader like me you shouldn’t be ashamed. One of my friends just reminded me it’s because I have a pure imagination, but let’s not also forget that Stephen King is an amazing writer who really focuses on character development. I believe that’s the main reasons his books are so long. He really digs deep into each character and you either love them or hate them and you feel tied to those characters.

The key to good fan fiction

So I just started watching the Netflix original series “Stranger Things” and one of my favorite parts about the story is the relationship/friendship between Nancy and Jonathan. I’m a sucker for a potential love story within a story. Some would consider that a subplot. I’m so into these two characters and their potential to develop a romantic relationship that I was curious about what kind of fan fiction is out there for these two. There was one fan fic that I really liked because I think it stayed true to the characters. The author made the characters believable. I don’t know if it’s because that person took from an actual scene and just reimagined it, but I think that’s only part of it. Some of the other fan fics weren’t believable to me because I felt like they didn’t stay true to the character’s personalities. I feel like that’s the key to good fan fiction: staying true to the characters and their development.

First impressions of IT by Stephen King

First of all let me say that I am super excited for the new adaptation of IT to come out on September 8th, 2017 (for anyone that is curious). Second, I am thoroughly preparing myself for what looks like is going to be a fantastic movie. I feel like the 2 minute teaser trailer that the audience got was just enough and for me it developed an obsession. I always knew Stephen King was an amazing writer in the back of my mind. I’ve read other stories by him like Carrie, The Green Mile, and Pet Semetary, so I am familiar with his work but just seeing the preview to this new adaptation of IT impressed upon me a new appreciation for Stephen King. After watching the trailer on YouTube I read the comments of course and a lot of the comments were about the original miniseries that came out in 1990 and of course the ORIGINAL source material written by none other than Stephen King. I read comments like the book is scarier than even the movie and that the book is super long but well worth the read, and so reading more and more comments like that I told myself that I have to definitely read the book before the movie comes out because the fact that a book can be scarier because you have to use pure imagination is incredibly awesome to me. I’m only a few chapters in and I am impressed more so with King’s story telling. I will admit though that I haven’t really gotten to the really scary bits yet. I’ve read some things in it so far that have been disturbing, but I’m expecting way more to come from the comments that I’ve seen and heard. However, I’ll tell you what I like about IT so far. First of all, King does a great job at character development. King shows us the kids as they’ve all grown up first but he also gives us glimpses of their childhood, which tells why they are the way they are and what makes them tick. I also think King does a great job at foreshadowing. From the beginning we see the brotherly bond that Bill and George have, but we also see the impending doom soon to follow. One scene that really struck me and I seemed to analyze in depth was Tom Rogan and Beverly’s relationship. Tom Rogan is Beverly’s abusive husband. Beverly gets a call to come back to Derry to defeat IT. What’s interesting is that we learn that Tom grew up in an abusive household with his mom, which obviously was passed down to him. Something that I noticed was that Tom seems to have a fear of being invisible. Maybe he was invisible to his mom growing up besides being visible enough to get a whooping for minor things. After Beverly gets off the phone call she seems to look right through him. That scared him. He keeps asking himself, “Are you there? Are you sure?” King’s writing is really striking and it does make me think and analyze certain themes. I’m looking forward to reading more. Stay tuned!